Off the Beaten Path in Italy & Sicily

Off the Beaten Path in Italy & Sicily

Have you been to Italy or Sicily and fallen head over heels? Do you dream of returning and seeing a new side of the Bel Paese? Never been but yearn to dive deep into the culture and explore the different regions? Well, this post is for you. Read on about our favorite lesser known, but must see, sites of Italy and Sicily.

Caesar Augustus Gardens & the Faraglioni Rocks

Visit the luxuriant Caesar Augustus Gardens for the best views Faraglioni rocks. Established by the German industrialist, Friedrich Alfred Krupp, the gardens are an incredible feat of engineering and have some of the most important island-flora found on Capri. While not large, the terraces and gardens form ornate picture frames for 360’ of Capri’s breathtaking panoramas, including one of the islands most iconic sights, the dramatic Faraglioni rocks.

The three towering rock formations rise from the blue Tyrrhenian Sea just off the island’s coast and are known by the names Stella, di Mezzo, and di Fuori. A snapshot with this family of sea stacks in the background is a must for all visitors to Capri. And the Caesar Augustus Gardens offer, what we think is, the most stunning view of them.

Sferracavallo

At the foot of the Mount Capo Gallo, built into coastal cliffs is the village of Sferracavallo. Founded in the 15th century by a group of fishermen, the town is included in the Isola delle Femmine – Capo Gallo Nature Reserve. The blue and aqua waters of the bay paired with an alternating coast of beaches and cliffs, make this little town a gem of a Sicilian fishing village, even if it is one of the most well-known in Palermo. Famous for its tasty and traditional fish cuisine, its restaurants boast fresh-caught fare and amazing views of the sea.

Isola Bella

Take a boat to Isola Bella in Italy’s Lake District. One of Lake Maggiore’s islands, Isola Bella’s palazzo, and exquisite gardens once hosted the nobility of Europe. The beautiful island is heavenly with its extravagantly Baroque Borromeo palace and gardens. Built for pleasure, the ornate palace has seen its fair share of famous guests and politics. Even more stunning than the palazzo, however, and the main reason to visit, is the perfectly manicured and gorgeous Italian-style garden, laid out on ten terraces.

When you visit, you’ll discover even more impressive sights in the ponds, fountains, and array of statues and sculptures. Full of flowers and rare exotic plants, the gardens were designed to awe. Not to be missed is the “Theatre” and it’s a crowning statue of a Unicorn, the emblem of the Borromeos. Perhaps, though, the most dazzling of all are the pairs of strutting white peacocks that call the island home. Needless to say, Isola Bella is absolutely spectacular.

The Dolomites Mountain Range

If you’re after the most beautiful photographs to take in Italy, a shot of the Dolomites should be high up there on your list. The Dolomites mountain range in the Italian Alps is known for being breathtaking from any view. However, if you’re not up for spending a week or two hiking around trying to capture reflections of the range in a mountain lake, one of the best views can be found in Renon (or locally, Ritten).

The high plateau rises above the city below and houses a commune of 17 villages that are exactly what you imagine Italian-mountain villages be. Follow the Adige Valley to Bolzano, capital of the southern part of the Tyrol. In Bolzano, take a cable car to the top of the Renon, and ride on the century-old Tramvia, or Funivia. Once at the top, you can enjoy incredible panoramas and perfect spots to frame your shot of this gorgeous range.

Mt. Etna

Mt. Etna in Sicily is the most active volcano in Europe and the oldest recorded active volcano in the world. Ascend through the fertile foothills, bypassing small villages, lush forests, ancient craters, and lava flow to see amazing lunar landscapes and houses surrounded by lava. Admire stunning panoramic views over the eastern Sicilian coast and the Ionian Sea. Plan on bringing your coat, the weather on Etna changes frequently and is often chilly, even in the middle of summer. If you’re in Sicily, Mt. Etna is a wonderful and unmissable experience and one to check off your bucket list.

Catullus’ Grottoes

On the shores of Lake Garda, in the small village of Sirmione Grotte di Catullo, an archaeological complex known as Catullus’ Grottoes has the most impressive example of a Roman villa in northern Italy. It’s referred to as Catullus’ Grottoes due to the legend that it was once home the Latin poet Catullus. When the remains of the villa were discovered, the rooms had caved in, the foliage had overgrown the site, and the villa appeared to be caves or grottoes. The remains of the villa are dated between the end of the 1st century BC and 1st century AD. According to archaeologists, it was an impressive house decorated with columns, mosaics, and frescoed walls.

The villa also once featured long porticoes and terraces almost suspended above the lake and a central, extensive garden. Today, the center garden is the location of the Grande Oliveto, Great Olive Grove, one of 1,500 on the complex. With the blue of Lake Garda in the background, the shining silver leaves of the olive trees, and the remaining columns and structures, Catullus’ Grottoes is a must for any traveler in the area.

Sassi di Matera

Those that are after all of it, the wonder, the photographs, the history, and the culture of a place must add a visit to Matera and the UNESCO World Heritage Site of the Sassi di Matera to their list. The town of Matera is fascinating, as it is one of the oldest continuously inhabited settlements in history, dating back to the Paleolithic period. The Sassi are perhaps among the first human settlements in Italy. A labyrinth of cave dwellings, churches, staircases, and arches, hewn out of the solid rock, the dwellings are as striking as the Mesa Verde Dwellings of Colorado. Roofs serve as streets, and the limestone facades hide the caves dug into the rock behind them. Buildings seemed stacked, one above the other, looking over the steep ravine. Across the ravine, visitors can still view honeycombed hillside settlements that date back 7,000 years.

A previous source of shame for the government, as Matera was an area steeped in poverty, what’s most surprising about the cliff-dwellings are that they were occupied until 1953 when the conditions were deemed to be unfit for living in. Today, many of the caves have been renovated and retrofitted, turning them into houses, hotels, restaurants, and bars.

Italy and Sicily are amazingly diverse and incredible destinations to visit. Their less known sites are very much worth a return trip or wider experience when you book your travels. Let us know in the comments if you have any sites that you think are worth a visit or favorite spots others just have to see for themselves.

Arianna Ambrutis

Having spent much of her life as nomadically as possible, Ari found a home with GET. As far as her travels have taken her, she's worked on an archaeological dig in Israel, sailed around Greek isles, experienced a crazy sunburn in Turkey, adores tomatoes in Italy, and thinks Paris and New York are just the bee’s knees. With her degree in Cultural Anthropology, Ari loves exploring a culture’s traditions, colloquialisms, and (most importantly) cuisines.

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